Course Descriptions

Career Pathways

Automotive

NATEF Accredited Program Since May 2018

Automotive I: This course contains an introduction to shop operations, safety, tools and equipment, and preparing the vehicle for both service and the customer. The engine repair course focuses on the overall internal combustion engine, cylinder and valve train, and lubrication and cooling systems. The transmission course is an introduction to both automatic and manual drive train and axles. This course also contains an introduction to electrical/electronic information and terminology including electrical/electronic system theory, battery systems, starting systems, and charging systems. It also contains an introduction to disc brakes, drum brakes, and antilock brakes.

Automotive II: This course contains a review on shop operations, safety, tools and equipment, and preparing the vehicle for both service and the customer. It also contains information on lighting systems, concepts of gauges, warning devices, driver information systems, horn system, wiper/washer system, and accessories system diagnostic repair. An Engine Performance and Steering and Suspension component contains information on fuel, air induction, and exhaust systems; concepts of emission control system; concepts of engine service; general suspension/steering theory; steering system inspection, diagnosis, and repair; concepts of front, rear, and miscellaneous systems; and wheel/tire alignment concepts. The Automotive Heating and Air information is for service and maintenance to the heating, ventilation, and engine cooling system.

Collision Repair

Collision Repair I: This course contains information on safety, tool identification/use, employee information, collision estimating, paint mixing/matching, service specification and service information, measurement, and personal/business finance, introduction to steering and suspension systems, concepts of electronic/electrical systems, concepts of brake systems, introduction to heating /cooling systems, concepts of cooling systems, introduction to restraint systems, inspecting and analyzing body components, repairs to outer body panels, frame inspection and repair, unibody inspection and repair, and introductory welding/cutting applications.

Collision Repair II: This course contains information on safety, tool identification/use, employee information, collision estimating, paint mixing/matching, service specification and service information, measurement, personal and business skills, metal finishing and body filling, movable glass/hardware, advanced welding, frame inspection and repair, unibody measurement and repair, fixed-glass procedures, and advanced welding/cutting applications.

Culinary Arts

Culinary Arts I: The foundational skills necessary in the foodservice industry are included in Culinary Arts I. Content such as food safety and sanitation; equipment, safety, and security; culinary foundations and math; and an introduction to the hospitality industry are included in the course. This course also emphasizes the real-world, hands-on practice of food preparation. Food preparation techniques included in this course include breakfast foods, dairy, and sandwiches; fruits, vegetables, salads, and garnishes; and potatoes and grains. Mastery of the competencies listed in this unit will prepare the student to take the NRA’s ServSafe exam to become ServSafe Food Safety certified

Culinary Arts II: Emphasizes the hands-on practice of food preparation. The food preparation techniques in this course include desserts and baked goods; meat, poultry, and seafood; and stocks, sauces, and soups. This course also places emphasis on an internship experience. While they participate in on-the-job training, students will use skills related to management and business concepts, customer communication, and customer service. This course should only be taken after students successfully pass Culinary Arts I.

Construction

NCCER Accredited Training & Education Facility Since December 2008

Construction I: The Construction course introduces students to fundamentals of construction safety, tools, math, and blueprint reading, as well as basic carpentry, electrical, masonry, and plumbing skills.

Construction II: The Carpentry course consists of an in-depth study of basic safety, construction math, materials, wall, ceiling, and roof framing; windows and doors; and construction essentials. This one-Carnegie-unit course should only be taken after students successfully pass Construction Core.

Digital Media Technology

Digital Media Technology I: Encompasses the foundation skills necessary in the digital media industry. Content such as safety, ethical issues and production, photography, graphic design, and print production will be offered to students. The Audio Production and Media Rich Content portion of the course emphasizes real-world, hands-on practice. Students will receive two Carnegie units upon completion of the course.

Digital Media Technology II: Focuses on the process of video production and editing as well as career opportunities in audio and video technology. Another component of the course is motion graphics. This two-Carnegie-unit course should only be taken after students successfully pass Digital Media Technology I.

Early Childhood Education

Early Childhood Education I: This year-long course begins with an introduction to personal and professional preparation for continued education, training, and careers in early childhood. Major topics of study in this course are history and trends of early childhood education, stages of child development, ranging from birth through age five, and children’s health and safety. Students are introduced to MSDH Guidelines and Regulations Governing Child Care Facilities. Other topics covered are related to the importance of observing and assessing children. Methods of child guidance techniques are also introduced in this course. Participation in a student organization is ongoing. Students will participate in field experience, internships, and job-shadowing. Students will develop skills toward meeting requirements for the CDA credential.

Early Childhood Education II: This course focuses on curriculum planning and the development of age-appropriate activities and lesson plans that encompass all areas of child development and administration and management techniques needed in order to operate a successful, quality child care facility. Other major topics covered in this course are related to state licensing requirements for child care facilities, management principles as a center director (including responsibilities regarding management of personnel, the facility’s physical indoor and outdoor space, inventory, record-keeping, accreditation, parental involvement, marketing, budgeting, and maintaining a healthy, effective learning environment). Students will continue to develop educational, career, and professional plans in the area of early childhood. Participation in a student organization is ongoing. Students will participate in field experience, internships, and job-shadowing. Students will continue to develop skills toward meeting requirements for the CDA credential.

Engineering

Engineering I: This course teaches students the history of engineering and the careers associated with the field. The students will also learn the foundations and fundamentals of engineering and materials, as well as the engineering design process and the steps one follows for successful design planning. Additionally, students are introduced to the advanced concepts of 3-D sketching and modeling with CAD software. The course introduces students to the field of robotics in engineering. It also focuses on several fields of engineering specialization.

Engineering II: This course is a comprehensive course that focuses on the following four systems: electrical, fluid, mechanical, and thermal. It also introduces students to flexible manufacturing systems, or how robotics and drafting work together to create products. Additionally, the course teaches students advanced robotic concepts. Students will also learn valuable workforce readiness skills and prepare for jobs in the field of engineering.

Health Sciences

Health Sciences I: The Health Sciences (Core) course introduces students to the theory and practical applications of tasks related to employment in the field of health science. Students will cover topics such as safety in the workplace, infection control, health care systems, and the vital organs of the human body. The course offers insight into careers in health care as well as educational requirements and the professional, legal, and ethical responsibilities involved.

Health Sciences II: The Healthcare and Clinical Services course helps the student establish insight in the healthcare field. Students will be exposed to the theory and applied tasks related to careers within health care. This course covers topics such as human growth and development, health informatics, information technology, and therapeutic and rehabilitative services. Other topics include medical and emergency services, mental health, and pharmacological and nursing services.

Law and Public Safety

Law and Public Safety I: This course focuses on the history of law and legal systems in the United States. Students will leave the class with a firm foundation of knowledge in these areas. Additionally, students will learn the importance of personal health and safety in the work environments associated with law and public safety. Students will also be introduced to the emergency services found in local communities. Additionally, students will focus on corrections in the state of Mississippi, studying specifically how jails and prisons function.

Law and Public Safety II: This course focuses on specialized areas and topics within the law and public safety arena. Students will learn about these particular areas and examine the daily tasks and responsibilities of the professionals associated with them. The course will offer students the opportunity to examine all areas of the military and the professions associated with each. Additionally, students will learn about emergency management and workplace skills and will have meaningful, relevant job-shadowing experiences with professionals.

Marketing and Economics

Marketing and Economics I: Major topics of study in this course are communication and customer service, professional development for careers in business management, economics, personal finance, business management, and business law.

Marketing and Economics II: This course introduces students to the marketing environment and the role of marketing in planning how a business will reach potential customers. Students will also learn how marketers develop pricing and promotion strategies to attract consumers as well as how to use market research to respond to customer needs and wants. Emphasis will be on the marketing functions of product/service management, distribution, selling, and marketing information systems.

Teacher Academy

Teacher Academy I: An entry-level course. Students gain foundation competencies related to students as learners, planning and assessing teaching, teaching strategies, and communication skills. Students receive hands-on field experiences (two Carnegie units).

Teacher Academy II: Provides students with the opportunity to gain advanced skills needed to enhance them as learners, teachers, and communicators. Students receive advanced hands-on field experiences (two Carnegie units).

Welding

NCCER Accredited Training & Education Facility Since December 2008

Welding I: This course focuses on the NCCER Learning Series Core and SMAW. Students will leave the class with a firm foundation of knowledge in the areas of employability skills, safety, and basic tool knowledge. Additionally, students will learn Oxyfuel Cutting fundamentals. Students will cover proper equipment setup, safety measures, and correct welding techniques.

Welding II: This course focuses on specialized welding symbols used in blueprints and drawings as well as PAC, CAC, and advanced techniques used in SMAW. Additionally, this course will offer students the opportunity to examine GMAW and FCAW. Additionally, students will learn about GTAW. Students will learn safety measures, setup procedures, and welding techniques for each type of welding.

Enhancement Courses

CPE (Career Pathway Experience)

CPE (Career Pathway Experience): Career Pathway Experience (CPE) is the new name for Cooperative Education. CPE provides the students the opportunity to take knowledge and skills learned in the pathway classroom and to apply and test that learning in the workplace. The CPE course will foster self-directed learning; strengthen the development of core academic skills through application in authentic situations; allow students to explore career options; enhance communication skills, leadership, and problem solving; and contribute to community economic development. The student will benefit from the CPE course due to the school’s ability to meet the needs of a diverse student population.

Essential elements of CPE are work-site training, training agreements, training plans, screening of students, paid employment, monitoring the field experience, and program accountability evaluations. Students are required to maintain employment on a continuous basis for the time they are enrolled in the class in order to maintain standing in CPE.

Family and Consumer Sciences

Child Development: Family Dynamics is a course that develops skills related to personal, family, and social issues. It includes instruction in dimensions of adolescent development, family decisions and responsibilities, social decisions and responsibilities, and management of family systems in today’s society. (Grades 9–12, 9 Week Course, 0.5 Carnegie Unit)

Family Dynamics: Develops skills related to personal, family, and social issues. It includes instruction in dimensions of adolescent development, family decisions and responsibilities, social decisions and responsibilities, and management of family systems in today’s society. (Grades 9–12, 9 Week Course, 0.5 Carnegie Unit)

Nutrition and Wellness: Develops skills related to proper nutrition and the concept of overall wellness. It includes instruction in nutrition, exercise and diet, healthy food choices, meal preparation, and components for a healthy lifestyle. (Grades 9–12, 9 Week Course, 0.5 Carnegie Unit)